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President Biden Revokes Trump’s Visa Ban – Immigration News for February 26, 2021

Immigration Lawyer Courtroom

President Biden Revokes Trump's Visa Ban - Immigration News for February 26, 2021

Immigration Lawyer Courtroom

Peri B. Edelman | February 26, 2021

Some of my clients have started to receive visa appointments and adjustment of status interviews. Please be patient with adjudication and scheduling.

President Biden Revokes Trump’s Visa Ban

In a proclamation issued on Wednesday, Biden officially rescinded the rule, asserting that the proclamation “does not advance the interests of the United States.” President Biden said, “To the contrary, it harms the United States, including by preventing certain family members of United States citizens and lawful permanent residents from joining their families here.”

Due to Trump's visa ban, a US State Department spokesperson confirmed there were at least 473,000 immigrant visa applicants still awaiting an interview.

Meanwhile, other would-be visa beneficiaries are still affected by Presidential Proclamation 10052, which continues to block certain work visa applicants from entering the US during the country’s economic recovery from the pandemic, at least until next month, as well as rules blocking visa issuance to applicants in the Schengen area, Iran, China, Brazil and South Africa.

ICE Issues a Memo on Temporary Enforcement Priorities

On February 18, 2021, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued interim guidance in support of the interim civil immigration enforcement and removal priorities which is effective immediately.

The interim priorities do not require or prohibit the arrest, detention, or removal of any noncitizen. ICE officers are expected to exercise their discretion thoughtfully.

  • Priority Category 1: National Security
  • Priority Category 2: Border Security - If a noncitizen was apprehended at the border on or after November 1, 2020; or if noncitizen was not physically present in the U.S. before November 1, 2020.
  • Priority Category 3: Public Safety - If a noncitizen has been convicted of an aggravated felony.

The guidance is intended to be temporary and will be replaced by enforcement guidelines from Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, expected within 90 days, the memo adds.

The interim guidance orders ICE officials to report certain enforcement information weekly for Mayorkas to use in formulating permanent guidance.

 

President Biden Revokes Trump Changes to Citizenship Test for Immigrants

On Monday, the Biden administration revoked changes to the citizenship test for noncitizens that were adopted in the last days of the Trump administration. With the exception of a few test administrations over the next few weeks (where some applicants will have the option of taking either the new or old versions of the test, in order to accommodate those who studied for the 2020 version on the expectation that it would be the one they would have to pass), USCIS is going to revert to the 2008 version for testing. This should be a great relief to noncitizens.

 

The Hyperlinks for the Most Recent Information Relating to Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Visa Scheduling Status in the United States Embassy/ U.S. Consulate General for the Following Countries:

I have been receiving many calls as to when a visa appointment will be scheduled. Many foreign Consulates have not scheduled any immigrant visa appointments since the pandemic began. Please be patient. If your case is in the queue, it will be scheduled once Consulate resume processing.

Mexico

Ecuador

El Salvador

Dominican Republic

Ghana

If you believe a recent change applies to you, please contact my office. If you know someone who it applies to, please refer them to my office. Thank you.

Disclaimer: This newsletter is a public resource of general information only and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This website should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. The information provided to you at this website is not intended to create and does not create an attorney-client relationship with Peri B. Edelman. Readers are responsible for obtaining such advice from their own legal counsel. Visitors to this website should not act, or refrain from acting, based upon any information available via this website, and should always seek the advice of competent counsel in the relevant jurisdiction. The existence of any particular link is intended solely to provide viewers with information which may be of interest to them. Peri B. Edelman takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of information contained on a linked site. Please be advised that information conveyed over the Internet may not be secure. Any information sent to the law office of Peri B. Edelman via electronic mail or through this website is not secure and is done so on a non-confidential basis. You're sending Peri B. Edelman or any of the firm’s personnel an email through this site does not create an attorney-client relationship. Peri B. Edelman expressly disclaims any and all liability with regard to actions taken or not taken based upon the content of this website.

Peri B. Edelman is an experienced attorney who practices Immigration Law in New York City. She provides immigration legal services, legal counsel on immigration matters, and legal support for court cases related to Immigration. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Peri B. Edelman is admitted to the New York and Connecticut Bars, U.S. Eastern District Court of New York, U.S. Southern District Court of New York, and United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.

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How to Get a Green Card in NYC

Permanent Resident Green card of United states of America on flag of USA

How to Get a Green Card in NYC

Permanent Resident Green card of United states of America on flag of USA

Peri B. Edelman | February 24, 2021

As an Immigration Attorney practicing immigration law in NYC, I have helped thousands of immigrants obtain their green cards. The green card process in NYC (also known as Adjustment of Status) is lengthy and tedious, and many immigrants decide not to apply because of how cumbersome obtaining a green card can be. However, my expertise as a green card lawyer, my guidance, and my intimate understanding of the immigration process in NYC have delivered green cards for many of my clients, and I make the green card process straightforward and expedient.

This guide will help you understand the process of obtaining a green card through the New York City immigration system – what you need to know, where you need to go, and what documents are needed to start living life in the United States as a permanent resident.

Table of Contents

    What is a Green Card?

    The official name of a green card is a Permanent Resident Card. Having this designation allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. Most green cards are valid for 10 years.

    A green card that has been granted on conditional permanent resident status is valid for 2 years and must be renewed through a process called Removal of Conditional Residence prior to the 2 year anniversary to obtain a permanent green card. When the card is about to expire, you can apply to renew your green card status.

    When you are living in the United States and apply for a green card, this is called an adjustment of status. If you apply for a green card when you are outside of the U.S., the process is known as consular processing.

    Why is having a green card helpful?

    Having a green card helps in many ways. With a green card you:

    • Have the right to live permanently in the United States.
    • Have the right to work in the United States. Jobs that are not open to non-permanent residents will be available to you, like certain government jobs
    • Can travel more easily to and from the United States
    • Become eligible for some benefits that help with education, healthcare, and NYC public assistance
    • Can sponsor certain relatives for visas or green cards
    • Can apply for U.S. citizenship after five years; 3 years if you’re married to a U.S. citizen

    Who Qualifies for a Green Card?

    To qualify for a green card, immigrants usually fall into one of the following categories:

    • Employment-based green card – you have an employer that will sponsor you
    • Family-based green card – you have a close family member such as a parent, spouse or child (this depends on the actual classification) who is either a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident who will sponsor you
    • Humanitarian-based green card – you are an asylum-seeker, a victim of domestic violence, a victim of a violent crime, a Special Immigrant, or a victim of human trafficking
    • Extraordinary Ability green card – if you have special skills that can be an asset to the United States, you can petition for yourself without a sponsor
    • Immigrant Investor green card – if you invest financially in the United States, you are eligible to apply for a green card

    Additionally, you must not be guilty of aggravated felonies or serious crimes (such as murder, sexual assault, and other serious crimes) outside of or within the United States.

    The Statue Of Liberty In NYC Home Of Green Card Lawyer Peri Edelman

    How to Apply to Get a Green Card in NYC

    Note: the following instructions are for immigrants residing in the United States, specifically New York City. If you are residing outside of the United States and plan to apply for a green card, you will need to use consular processing.

    The two main types of green cards are employment-based and family-based, so this article will focus on those.

    How to apply for a family-based green card in NYC

    To apply for a family-based green card, the relative who sponsors you must be an immediate relative, like a partner, parent or child. The beneficiary can be either a spouse, parent, unmarried child under 21, or unmarried stepchild under 21.

    The petitioner will file an immigration petition for the beneficiary with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services along with an Adjustment of Status application, other requisite forms, and evidence.

    Forms for family-based green cards

    • I-130 Petition – the petitioner must complete this form
    • I-130A, Supplemental Information – for spousal green cards only
    • I-864, Affidavit of Support - for all green cards
    • Form I-485 – Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. This form would be used for beneficiaries already in the U.S.
    • I-639, Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record

    Documents needed for family-based green cards

    The documents you will need for your family-based green card application vary depending on the situation. Always consult with a lawyer before submitting your application. Documents you will need may include:

    • Proof of the petitioner's legal status
    • Proof of family relationship
    • Proof of U.S. citizenship and a copy of birth certificate if born in the US, or copy of citizenship naturalization certificate, or copy of US passport
    • If permanent resident, then a copy of the petitioner’s green card
    • G-28 (Notice of Appearance for the Attorney or Representative) – only needed if represented by an attorney
    • Your Marriage Certificate (if applicable)
    • Proof That Your Previous Marriage Ended Legally (if applicable)
    • Evidence Showing Name Change (if applicable)
    • Passport Photographs, color
    • I-94, Arrival/Departure
    • 2 G-325A Forms Biographic Data Sheets (if applicable)

    How to apply for an employment based green card in NYC

    There are five types of employment-based green cards: EB1, EB2, EB3, EB4, EB5

    Most employment-based green cards fall into the first 3 categories:

    1. EB1: An employee with extraordinary ability in the science, arts, education, athletics, or business. Typical professions for this category include professors, researchers and Ph.D. holders. It can also include people working in US as managers and executives on international transfer basis (Company transfer L1 holder).
    2. EB2: An employee with extra ability in the field of science, arts or business, and advanced degree professionals (PG. degree holder).
    3. EB3: This includes professionals with Bachelor/ Graduate degrees, and other skilled workers.

    Your employer will have to prove on the immigrant petition that there are no U.S. workers who can meet the demands or required skillset of the position you will be filling.

    Forms for employment-based green cards

    You and your employment sponsor will have to complete the following forms:

    • Form I-485 – Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status
    • Form I-140, Petition for Immigration – to be completed and submitted by your employer
    • Form ETA-9035 - Labor Certification which has been certified by the U.S. Department of Labor

    Documents needed for employment-based green cards

    Which documents you need from this list is dependent on your specific situation. It is recommended that you consult with a lawyer to know for sure. These are some of the documents that may be needed:

    • Two passport photos
    • A copy of your passport
    • A copy of your birth certificate
    • A copy of your non-immigrant visa (if applicable)
    • A copy of parole stamp issued by a U.S. officer (if applicable)
    • Copy of every I-94 recorded under your name
    • Proof that you have maintained lawful status since arriving in the U.S. (or that you are exempt)
    • Form I-693 – Medical examination report
    • Documentation of past or present J-1 or J-2 nonimmigrant status (if applicable)
    • Form I-485 Supplement A – Adjustment of Status Under Section 245(i) (if applicable)
    • Receipt of Filed Fees – receipts have to be preserved

    How to file your green card application

    Once your application and forms are complete and you have the appropriate documentation, you should submit your application to the appropriate USCIS office. The correct office for your situation can vary, so consult with a lawyer before submitting the application.

    The sun rising over an aerial view of NYC

    The Green Card Interview

    After your green card application has been accepted, an in-person interview will be scheduled at a New York City USCIS office. NYC’s USCIS office is located at:

    Jacob K. Javits Federal Building
    26 Federal Plaza (Lafayette Street entrance)
    New York, NY 10278

    The petitioner and beneficiary will be interviewed by a USCIS Immigration Services Officer. What is asked may include questions to ensure the accuracy of your application: if it’s a spousal application, you may be asked questions that seek to determine if the marriage is bonafide; if it’s a relative-based application, the questions asked may be intended to ensure there is an actual relation.

    During this interview process, the immigration officer can ask questions where you accidentally make a fraudulent claim. They may also ask questions they are prohibited from asking. Both cases are good reasons to have a lawyer accompany you for the interview process (a lawyer can be present during the interview).

    A Stack of Green Card Applications In A Wire Basket in NYC

    Why Having a Lawyer’s Help Is Important When Applying for a Green Card

    Between the application, the supporting documents and evidence, and the interview, there are many things that can go wrong during the green card process. If you complete the information incorrectly, forget to provide the right supporting evidence, or say something during the interview that sounds fraudulent, the following can happen:

    • Your green card approval is delayed
    • Your green card is denied
    • You may have to resubmit the application with a waiver application, costing more court fees
    • If found to have made fraudulent statements on the application or during the interview, you will be removed from the United States.

    An immigration attorney will help you navigate the immigration process and lengthy green card process, ensure you have all the proper documentation you need, prevent the immigration officer from asking questions they are prohibited from asking, and protect you should immigration attempt to deport you after your green card interview.

    A green card application is a time-consuming and costly process. Don’t let your hard work, money, and time go to waste because you forgot a document or made an innocent mistake – contact Peri Edelman, Immigration Attorney, to make sure your green card application is done right the first time.

    Disclaimer: This blog is a public resource of general information only and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This website should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. The information provided to you at this website is not intended to create and does not create an attorney-client relationship with Peri B. Edelman. Readers are responsible for obtaining such advice from their own legal counsel. Visitors to this website should not act, or refrain from acting, based upon any information available via this website, and should always seek the advice of competent counsel in the relevant jurisdiction. The existence of any particular link is intended solely to provide viewers with information which may be of interest to them. Peri B. Edelman takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of information contained on a linked site. Please be advised that information conveyed over the Internet may not be secure. Any information sent to the law office of Peri B. Edelman via electronic mail or through this website is not secure and is done so on a non-confidential basis. You're sending Peri B. Edelman or any of the firm’s personnel an email through this site does not create an attorney-client relationship. Peri B. Edelman expressly disclaims any and all liability with regard to actions taken or not taken based upon the content of this website.

    Peri B. Edelman is an experienced attorney who practices Immigration Law in New York City. She provides immigration legal services, legal counsel on immigration matters, and legal support for court cases related to Immigration. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Peri B. Edelman is admitted to the New York and Connecticut Bars, U.S. Eastern District Court of New York, U.S. Southern District Court of New York, and United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.

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    Immigration Reform Bill Introduced in the Senate and House of Representatives – Immigration News for February 19, 2021

    Wooden And Gold Gavel Used In Immigration Law Resting On A Table

    Immigration Reform Bill Introduced in the Senate and House of Representatives - Immigration News for February 19, 2021

    Wooden And Gold Gavel Used In Immigration Law Resting On A Table

    Peri B. Edelman | February 19, 2021

    Immigration Reform Bill Introduced in the Senate and House of Representatives

    Senator Bob Menendez and Representative Linda Sanchez introduced a bill to the Senate and House yesterday. This reform bill, if passed, would be the 1st immigration reform bill to be passed in twenty-five (25) years.

    Certain elements of the bill have previously been floated in Congress. Initially, the Democrats stated that they are looking for a comprehensive reform bill. However, they are open to breaking up the bill. The Biden administration has also stated a willingness to break up the reform bill into different parts.

    Here are the highlights of the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021:

     1. Pathway to Citizenship for Undocumented Individuals
    The U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021 would create an eight-year path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented people in the United States. First, it would provide them with a new type of temporary status for five (5) years and then allow them to obtain U.S. citizenship after another three (3) years. The path to citizenship only applies to people who have been in the country since Jan. 1, 2021.

    This part of the bill is more than likely to be struck down as there is too much opposition to this component.

    2. Pathway to Citizenship for DACA and TPS recipients
    Individuals who have Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) or qualify for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) from countries suffering from war and natural disasters, who can prove they have a work history and other requirements would be granted residency and then citizenship.

    It has been surmised that this part of the bill may get passed.

     3. Increasing Visa Caps
    The bill would increase visa options on family-based green cards by increasing the country caps and reopening approximately 200,000 unused bills from previous fiscal years. Employment-based visas would also increase from 140,000 to 170,000 per fiscal year.

    4. Change to the word “Alien”
    The bills changes the word “alien” to the term “noncitizen” when describing undocumented individuals in the Code of Federal Regulations.

    5. Lift of 3 and 10 year bars
    The bill lifts the 3 and 10 year bars that restrict individuals from re-entering the country if they overstayed their visa.

    6. Increase of U non-immigrant visas
    The bill triples the number of visas available from 10,000 to 30,000 per fiscal year. These visas are available to individuals who have been victims of serious violent crimes and domestic violence in the United States.

    7. Border Backlog
    The measure provides funding for more immigration judges and support staff to help with the backlog of asylum seekers. The bill also sets up $4 billion in aid for Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras to address the root cause of migration in those countries.

     8. Increased Border Security
    The bill provides for increased security at ports of entry focused on detecting drugs and other contraband.

    9. Existing Criminal Penalties
    Existing criminal penalties for unauthorized immigrants remain in place, including those that bar certain criminals from obtaining green cards. Under existing law, anyone convicted of an aggravated felony or a crime involving illegal narcotics is not admissible in the U.S.

    10. Increase of Diversity Visas
    The bill also increases the number of diversity visas issued for countries with low rates of immigration to the U.S. from 55,000 to 80,000 per fiscal year.

    This newsletter is a general information regarding recent changes in immigration law. Every matter is different. If you believe a recent change applies to you, please contact my office. If you know someone who it applies to, please refer them to my office. Thank you.

    Disclaimer: This newsletter is a public resource of general information only and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. This website should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. The information provided to you at this website is not intended to create and does not create an attorney-client relationship with Peri B. Edelman. Readers are responsible for obtaining such advice from their own legal counsel. Visitors to this website should not act, or refrain from acting, based upon any information available via this website, and should always seek the advice of competent counsel in the relevant jurisdiction. The existence of any particular link is intended solely to provide viewers with information which may be of interest to them. Peri B. Edelman takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of information contained on a linked site. Please be advised that information conveyed over the Internet may not be secure. Any information sent to the law office of Peri B. Edelman via electronic mail or through this website is not secure and is done so on a non-confidential basis. You're sending Peri B. Edelman or any of the firm’s personnel an email through this site does not create an attorney-client relationship. Peri B. Edelman expressly disclaims any and all liability with regard to actions taken or not taken based upon the content of this website.

    Peri B. Edelman is an experienced attorney who practices Immigration Law in New York City. She provides immigration legal services, legal counsel on immigration matters, and legal support for court cases related to Immigration. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Peri B. Edelman is admitted to the New York and Connecticut Bars, U.S. Eastern District Court of New York, U.S. Southern District Court of New York, and United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.

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    H-1B Cap Initial Registration Period Opens in March & other Immigration News for February 12, 2021

    H-1B Cap Initial Registration Period Opens in March & other Immigration News for February 12, 2021

    American-Flag

    Peri B. Edelman | February 12, 2021

    H-1B Cap Initial Registration Period Opens on March 9 for FY 2022

    On February 5, 2021, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced the initial registration period for the fiscal year (FY) 2022 H-1B cap will open at 12:00p.m Eastern on March 9, 2021 and will run through 12:00 p.m. Eastern on March 25, 2021. Prospective petitioners (employers) and representatives will be able to fill out petitioner and beneficiary information and submit their registrations. A confirmation number will be assigned to each registration submitted for the FY 2022 H-1B cap. For more information of this procedure, please contact Peri B Edelman, Attorney at Law.

    USCIS Taking Two Years to Process Many Applications For H-1B Spouses

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) takes two years to process applications for many spouses of H-1B visa holders. Prior to March 2019, the USCIS would typically adjudicate an H-4 dependent (spouse) petition and the H-4 employment authorization document (EAD) application at the same time as the corresponding H-1B petition. Premium processing of the H-1B petition would ensure adjudication within 15 days. However, the USCIS insistence on the biometrics has delayed the H-4 applications considerably. A new lawsuit argues that wait times for extensions for spouses of H-1B visas far exceed those of other applicants for extensions.

    New Biden Administration Proposed Rules for ICE Point to Fewer Arrests and Potential Deportations, and a More Restrained Agency

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is preparing to issue new guidelines to agents this week that would reduce arrests and deportations. The draft guidelines are awaiting approval by DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. It is reported that these convictions would not include drug-based crimes (less serious offenses), simple assault, DUI, money laundering, property crimes, fraud, tax crimes, solicitation, or charges without convictions. Instead, ICE agents will focus on national security threats, recent border crossers and individuals completing prison and jail terms for aggravated felony convictions.

    Texas Federal Judge Blocks President Biden’s 100-day Deportation Pause for 2 More Weeks

    Judge Drew Tipton issued a 14-day suspension of Biden’s moratorium on Jan. 26. The pause in deportations was part of Biden’s attempted day one overhaul of several of former President Donald Trump’s immigration policies. But Governor Paxton of Texas quickly filed a lawsuit in response to Biden’s moratorium, claiming the state would face financial harm if undocumented immigrants were released from custody, because of costs associated with health care and education.

    Biden Administration stated Most Immigrants will Still be Turned Away at the Border

    Despite activist hopes that President Joe Biden would change course from Trump, White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Wednesday told reporters that "the vast majority" of immigrants will continue to face expulsion at the border. The Biden administration has warned that it will take time to undo Trump’s immigration policies and has already ordered a direct review of such policies.

    President Biden Terminates Trump Border Construction

    Yesterday, President Biden has rescinded the emergency order issued by Trump to justify the construction of the border wall with Mexico. Biden determined that the declaration of a national emergency to construct the border wall was unwarranted.

    This newsletter is a general information regarding recent changes in immigration law. Every matter is different. If you believe a recent change applies to you, please contact my office. If you know someone who it applies to, please refer them to my office. Thank you.

    Peri B. Edelman is an experienced attorney who practices Immigration Law in New York City. She provides immigration legal services, legal counsel on immigration matters, and legal support for court cases related to Immigration. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Peri B. Edelman is admitted to the New York and Connecticut Bars, U.S. Eastern District Court of New York, U.S. Southern District Court of New York, and United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.

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    DHS encourages COVID-19 Immigrant Vaccination & other Immigration News for February 5, 2021

    Woman In A Hijab Tests A Group Of Immigrants for COVID-19

    DHS encourages COVID-19 Immigrant Vaccination & other Immigration News for February 5, 2021

    Woman In A Hijab Tests A Group Of Immigrants for COVID-19

    Peri B. Edelman | February 5, 2021

    Senate Confirmed the First Latino and Immigrant as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

    On Tuesday, the Senate confirmed Alejandro N. Mayorkas as secretary of DHS. Vice President Kamala Harris swore Mr. Mayorkas into office, making him the first Latino and the first immigrant to hold that position which has been vacant for 21 months.

    Supreme Court Cancels Oral Arguments for 2 Trump Immigration Policies

    The Supreme Court has cancelled oral arguments of 2 Trump orders --President Trump's border wall construction, and the other, the asylum "remain in Mexico" policy. President Biden through executive orders has already issued executive orders pausing both the erection of the border wall, and the "remain in Mexico" policy, under which approximately 68,700 asylum seekers and others who crossed the border without authorization, were sent back to Mexico to wait for their asylum applications to be processed. Both cases are still pending in the Court but will probably be dismissed as moot.

    DHS encourages COVID-19 Immigrant Vaccination

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on Monday that it would not conduct enforcement activities near COVID-19 vaccination sites. DHS is encouraging immigrants to get vaccinated regardless of their status.

    President Biden signed Executive Orders on Tuesday

    The Orders are as follows:

    1. A review of Trump’s ‘public charge’ rule, which makes it more challenging for poorer immigrants to obtain permanent residency in the United States.
    2. An asylum-focused order called on U.S. agencies to address drivers of migration in Central America to the United States, expand legal pathways to the United States and consider ending Trump-era asylum pacts with Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.
    3. A review of the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a Trump program that ordered non-Mexican 68,700 asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their U.S. court hearings, but not immediately cancel the program.
    4. To establish a task force designed to reunite more than 600 migrant children with their parents after federal authorities had split them up at the border in 2017 and 2018. Officials say first lady Jill Biden is expected to play an active role in the effort.

    President Biden Raises the Cap on Refugees

    President Biden announced yesterday he plans to raise the cap on refugees allowed to enter the U.S. President Trump set a cap of 15,000 for the current fiscal year — the lowest level since the passage of the Refugee Act in 1980. President Biden pledged to increase the annual refugee admissions cap to 125,000 in the 12-month period starting Oct. 1, the next fiscal year. Biden must consult Congress before setting the annual limit.

    This newsletter is a general information regarding recent changes in immigration law. Every matter is different. If you believe a recent change applies to you, please contact my office. If you know someone who it applies to, please refer them to my office. Thank you.

    Peri B. Edelman is an experienced attorney who practices Immigration Law in New York City. She provides immigration legal services, legal counsel on immigration matters, and legal support for court cases related to Immigration. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Peri B. Edelman is admitted to the New York and Connecticut Bars, U.S. Eastern District Court of New York, U.S. Southern District Court of New York, and United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.